Are biorhythms pseudoscience?

Biorhythms are based on the idea that cycles, which can be calculated and graphed, can be used to make predictions about their life. Biorhythms are considered a pseudoscience, meaning they don't have the same scrutiny and objective research compared to the other sciences.

Are biorhythms pseudoscience?

Biorhythms are based on the idea that cycles, which can be calculated and graphed, can be used to make predictions about their life. Biorhythms are considered a pseudoscience, meaning they don't have the same scrutiny and objective research compared to the other sciences. Circadian rhythms have great scientific validity, unlike biorhythms. We, as living organisms, are affected by biological cycles.

All living things, from elephants to mushrooms, evolve and adapt to the universe around them. They have patterns that we sometimes see, and sometimes they are so subtle, that even the organism itself does not know them. For example, just as creatures on the seashore will follow the movements and times of the tide, we too, as humans, experience a 24-hour waking cycle. Humans also prefer to sleep in the dark, unlike other nocturnal animals (and contrary to the belief of my own body's sleep cycle), which is one of the reasons why so many people have studied circadian rhythms; and it is not surprising that circadian rhythms have great scientific validity, to difference of biorhythms.

But where would be the fun of talking about it? Biorhythms are theoretical cycles that supposedly dictate health and behavior. The name evokes circadian rhythms, with the difference that circadian rhythms are based on scientific observation, while biorhythms are pure pseudoscience. Do not confuse circadian rhythms with biorhythms: one is science, the other is simply tedious, says Dr. Karl.

But I also think that from time to time things get out of that order, or get messy, resulting in what my family and I call “bad biorhythms,” until your body, mind or emotions are regulated back in order. The pseudoscience of biorhythms, sometimes considered on a par with astrology, except that the fault, dear Web surfer, is within you instead of the stars, has been around for a century, and the Internet offers many sites that will allow you to chart your own. Over the next half century, as part of this actual research on real human biorhythms, it was discovered that human hormones were released in cycles. However, unlike biorhythms, which are claimed to have precise and unalterable periods, circadian rhythms are found observing the cycle itself and periods are found to vary in length depending on biological and environmental factors.

Biorhythm programs were a common application on personal computers; and in the late 1970s, there were also portable biorhythm calculators on the market, Kosmos 1 and Casio Biolator. Both the theoretical basis and the practical scientific verification of the theory of biorhythm are lacking. Biorhythms, on the other hand, although widely refuted, detail the idea that a person's life can change depending on where in his various biorhythmic cycles he is. Just do a search for “biorhythms” and you will probably get some results for sites that offer similar programs to download.

Skeptical evaluations of the various biorhythm proposals led to a series of criticisms that criticized the issue published in the 1970s and 1980s. Those who push calculators and biorhythm books to a gullible public are guilty of making fraudulent claims. So how did I get caught up in this New Age “theory of biorhythm”? Next time I'll tell you the tragic story.

Floyd Bellafiore
Floyd Bellafiore

Award-winning music advocate. Devoted travel junkie. Certified social media evangelist. Award-winning web buff. Hardcore internet fanatic. Incurable zombie specialist.

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