How are biorhythms calculated?

Biorhythms are based on the idea that cycles, which can be calculated and graphed, can be used to make predictions about your life. The scientific basis for calculating biorhythm is found in chronobiology.

How are biorhythms calculated?
Biorhythms are based on the idea that cycles, which can be calculated and graphed, can be used to make predictions about your life. The scientific basis for calculating biorhythm is found in chronobiology. There, human time cycles are scientifically examined and both personal and general patterns and rhythms are determined. The basis of biorhythm was laid at the beginning of the 20th century by the Viennese psychologist Hermann Swoboda and the Berlin doctor Wilhelm Fliess - associates of the famous psychiatrist Sigmund Freud.

Fliess believed that he had discovered consistent regularities in his patients' medical records and formulated a referral as a period theory. Both tried to discover a regularity behind the good and bad times of a life. Critical days, potentially bad, are those transitions in which there is a change from positive to negative and vice versa. If there is a transition of all three phases on the same day, this can have crisis-like consequences according to biorhythmic theory and, on the contrary, the coincidence of positive days can result in particularly good days.

It is possible to calculate one's biorhythm using the date of birth. These calculations will result in a graph showing three curves, each representing one of the three cycles. It is recommended to do these calculations in a spreadsheet such as the well-known Excel, since they are quite complicated and numerous, especially if you want to calculate your personal cycles for a whole month or even a whole year. Keep in mind that there are more precise methods that involve the exact time of birth (assuming the theory of biorhythm is correct).



When considering your results in daily life, keep in mind that the science that deals with biorhythms is not (yet) an established science. Through medical research, doctors have discovered that there are periodicity and rhythms during a person's life, although few doctors believe that they correspond to those described as biorhythms. The plausibility of biorhythmic is contested by several mathematicians, some biologists and other scientists. Without them, biorhythms became another pseudoscientific statement that people are willing to accept without the required evidence.

The 23-day and 28-day rhythms used by biorhythmists were first devised in the late 19th century by Wilhelm Fliess, a Berlin doctor and friend of Sigmund Freud. According to the theory of biorhythms, a person's life is influenced by rhythmic biological cycles that affect his ability in various domains, such as mental, physical and emotional activity.
The three cycles may be calculated using just two pieces of information: your birth date and the date on which the calculations should begin. The following formulae are used to compute each cycle as a sine wave:

  • Physical = sin (2Πt / 23)
  • Emotional = sin (2Πt / 28)
  • Intellectual = sin (2Πt /33)
Where Π = Pi and t = is the number of days since birth. The "Biorhythms" graphic below shows the three computed sine waves placed on a graph.




Creating biorhythm charts for personal use was popular in the United States during the 1970s; many places (especially video rooms and entertainment areas) had a biorhythm machine that provided graphics upon entering the date of birth.

The theory of biorhythms states that one's life is affected by rhythmic biological cycles, and seeks to make predictions regarding these cycles and the personal ease of carrying out cycle-related tasks. Skeptical evaluations of the various biorhythm proposals led to a series of criticisms that criticized the issue published in the 1970s and 1980s. Some advocates think that biorhythms could be related to bioelectricity and its interactions in the body. Creating biorhythm charts for personal use was very popular in the United States during the 1970s; many places (especially video rooms and entertainment areas) had a biorhythm machine where you could enter your date of birth and get an updated chart.


Floyd Bellafiore
Floyd Bellafiore

Award-winning music advocate. Devoted travel junkie. Certified social media evangelist. Award-winning web buff. Hardcore internet fanatic. Incurable zombie specialist.

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