NOBEL PRIZE For Research On Biological Rhythms

Researchers Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael W.

NOBEL PRIZE For Research On Biological Rhythms


Researchers Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael W. Young were awarded the coveted Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2017 for their work on circadian rhythms. They discovered a gene that helps regulate the body's clock by researching fruit flies, which have a genetic composition that is very similar to that of humans. The researchers demonstrated that the gene creates a protein that accumulates in cells overnight and subsequently degrades throughout the day. This process can have an impact on how well you sleep, how sharply your brain performs, and other aspects of your life. When these groundbreaking findings were discovered, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) supported all three researchers.

Biological rhythm is a phrase that is often used interchangeably with circadian rhythm. These rhythms are a series of bodily functions regulated by the internal clock. They control cycles such as sleep and wakefulness, body temperature, hormone secretion, and more. Circadian rhythms are physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a 24-hour cycle.

These natural processes respond primarily to light and dark and affect most living things, including animals, plants and microbes. Chronobiology is the study of circadian rhythms. An example of a circadian rhythm related to light is sleeping at night and being awake during the day. The image of the average circadian cycle of adolescents shows the circadian rhythm cycle of a typical adolescent.

>>> Click Here <<< >>> Limited Offer <<<


Biological rhythm, periodic biological fluctuation in an organism that corresponds to and responds to periodic environmental change. Examples of such changes include cyclical variations in the relative position of the Earth with respect to the Sun and Moon and in the immediate effects of such variations, for example. A biological rhythm is any recurrent endogenous cycle (behavioral or physiological) that persists in the absence of geophysical or environmental temporal signs. Biological rhythms are normally dragged (synchronized) to environmental signals to ensure coordination of behavior and physiology with the appropriate time of day or year.

Circadian rhythms show a period of approximately 24 h, while circanual (seasonal) rhythms circulate over the course of a year. Both types of rhythms are coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SNS) of the brain. Understanding the molecular and endocrine mechanisms underlying biological rhythms is of interest both for basic discovery and for broader environmental and clinical applications. Biological rhythms are usually synchronized with environmental events, such as changes in daylight.

However, experiments have shown that many biological rhythms continue to have the same cycle even without signs from the environment. These biological rhythms are endogenous, meaning they originate inside the body rather than relying on external signals. In humans, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SNA) is the main biological clock that regulates circadian rhythms of sleep. The SCN is found in the hypothalamus of the brain.

When light stimulates receptors in the retina of the eye, the receptors send signals to the SCN. The SCN then sends signals to the nearby pineal gland, which secretes melatonin, a hormone that regulates the sleep cycle. Biological rhythms are repetitive biological processes. Some types of biological rhythms have been described as biological clocks.

They can vary in frequency from microseconds to less than one repetitive event per decade. Biological rhythms are studied by chronobiology. In the biochemical context, biological rhythms are called biochemical oscillations.



>>> Click Here <<< >>> Limited Offer <<<

Floyd Bellafiore
Floyd Bellafiore

Award-winning music advocate. Devoted travel junkie. Certified social media evangelist. Award-winning web buff. Hardcore internet fanatic. Incurable zombie specialist.

Leave Message

Required fields are marked *